Here & Now

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NPR and WBUR's live midday news program

723 épisodes

21 novembre 2019
Georgia Rep. Hank Johnson told TMZ Sports this week that free-agent quarterback Colin Kaepernick is a "victim" and suggested that Congress could take action against the NFL because he doesn't have a job in the league. Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca weighs in on his comments. Also, in Bolivia, more than 30 people have died in clashes between supporters of former President Evo Morales and security forces since October's disputed elections. Host Tonya Mosley speaks with NPR's Philip Reeves about the crisis.
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20 novembre 2019
An op-ed in The New York Times on Wednesday argues tourism is essential to protecting many vulnerable habitats. We talk about that idea with Here & Now's transportation analyst Seth Kaplan. Also, some cities and states have taken steps to ban flavored vaping products that are popular with children. But the policies don't directly help children who are already addicted. One school district in Fairfax County, Virginia is trying to address that issue, WAMU's Kavitha Cardoza reports.
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20 novembre 2019
Fifty years ago this week, Apollo 12 landed on the surface of the moon. But it seems this moon mission is overshadowed by the more famous Apollo 11 and Apollo 13 landings. NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports. Also, researchers at BioMarin Pharmaceutical have created a controversial drug that helps regulate bone development in children with the most common type of dwarfism. But some argue it's a profit-driven solution in search of a problem.
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19 novembre 2019
Apple has taken down nearly 200 apps related to vaping, citing "a public health crisis and a youth epidemic." The move raises questions about how Apple decides what is allowed in the App Store, and what is not. Host Tonya Mosley talks with Kara Swisher, editor-at-large at Recode. Also, Gannett and GateHouse Media have agreed to merge in a deal aimed at cutting costs and pursuing a digital transformation. We talk with media analyst John Carroll about the new deal.
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19 novembre 2019
Now that school shootings are a common occurrence in the U.S., schools are training students on how to respond. One of the first lessons of the year at a school in Northern Colorado focused on three actions: evacuate, barricade, and fight. Leigh Paterson reports. Also, after World War I, nations that had lost millions of soldiers were looking for a way to honor those dead. They found a simple concept: The remains of one unidentified soldier, buried with honor, to recognize the sacrifice of the many. Here & Now's ...
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18 novembre 2019
Record-breaking temperatures in Hawaii this past summer may lead to unprecedented coral bleaching. It's caused by changes in water temperature, light or nutrients and it can kill coral. Scientists on an island in Oahu are taking underwater photos to create a one-of-a-kind, time-lapsed documentation of bleaching. And, the Dog Aging Project is seeking canine participants in what could be the largest study on aging ever conducted. The goal is to discover more about human aging by studying dogs, which share many of the same genetic markers with humans.
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18 novembre 2019
Wildlife filmmaker Lindsay McCrae spent time filming emperor penguins raising chicks in Antarctica. He talks with us about his new book, "My Penguin Year: Life Among the Emperors," which chronicles his experience. Also, the barriers to offering drug-based treatment for opioid abuse in jails are two-fold: There aren't enough prescribing doctors and opioids can be abused in jail. But KUOW's Amy Radil reports a program in Washington state has created a pilot to address these issues. So far, it's working.
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15 novembre 2019
Private military contractors have been involved in modern conflicts from the Middle East to Africa. A former military contractor explains how mercenaries are used and what impact they can have on warfare. Also, Germany is looking for ways to stop the rise of far-right extremism. A member of the German Parliament responds.
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15 novembre 2019
The former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, Marie Yovanovitch, is testifying on Capitol Hill Friday as part of the House impeachment inquiry. ABC political director Rick Klein and "Washington Journal" host Jesse Holland discuss. And, Taylor Swift is accusing her former record company of blocking her from performing her old songs at the upcoming American Music Awards. The latest controversy involving the artist is highlighting what can happen when artists don't own the master rights to their songs.
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14 novembre 2019
Tobias Menzies takes over the role of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh in season three of the Netflix show "The Crown." We talk with him about the news season that premieres this Sunday. Also, there's already some snow on the ground in Vermont, which means the state is gearing up for ski season. Vermont Public Radio's Henry Epp reports that some resorts are offering generous benefits, even for entry-level positions like lift operators and parking attendants.
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14 novembre 2019
Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with Kitty Block, CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, about the current state of the fur industry after Queen Elizabeth II vowed not to wear real fur anymore. Also, the impeachment hearings continue on Thursday with the testimony of former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch. Aaron David Miller, senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, joins us to discuss what the hearings might reveal about U.S. foreign policy under President Trump.
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13 novembre 2019
In Australia, dozens of fires are burning out of control in New South Wales, the country's most populous state and the conditions have sparked a fresh debate among government leaders about the role of climate change. Also, dairy producer Dean Foods has filed for bankruptcy, citing challenges amid increasing consumer demand for plant-based milk alternatives. Journalist Dom DiFurio of the Dallas Morning News has the latest.
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13 novembre 2019
The agricultural industry is one of the hardest-hit sectors in the United States' trade war with China. Amid new hopes of a trade deal, Emily Pontecorvo reports on how Pennsylvania farmers are faring as they bring in their second harvest of the season. Also, KCRW DJ Anthony Valadez shares five artists he thinks will be huge in 2020.
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12 novembre 2019
An encampment in Matamoros, Mexico, is a stopping point for asylum-seekers who are waiting for a chance at legal entry into the United States. The conditions at the encampment are poor but a group of U.S. volunteers called Team Brownsville is crossing the border daily to help. Also, Bakersfield, California, has a rich country music history, and a massive new box set documents that legacy. Scott B. Bomar, author of "The Bakersfield Sound," joins us.
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12 novembre 2019
The Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday on the Trump administration's decision to end DACA. The Obama-era policy gives young immigrants who were brought to the country illegally as children permission to live and work in the U.S. A DACA advocate explains the significance of the proceeding. Also, Judd Apatow has edited a collection of the late comedian Garry Shandling's work. We talk to him about "It's Garry Shandling's Book."
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11 novembre 2019
Kanye West's new gospel album "Jesus Is King" is making history on the Billboard charts, but former music executive Naima Cochrane writes that West isn't the first hip-hop artist to go gospel. And, Chinese online retailer Alibaba recorded a record $31 billion in sales on Singles Day. The Chinese holiday was created by students in the 1990s as an alternative to Valentine's Day.
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11 novembre 2019
Author Neil Pasricha says we live in the best time ever to be alive, but we're not resilient. He tells us how to handle failure and boost our creativity by taking "untouchable days." Also, more than 1,500 asylum seekers are living in tent cities close to the U.S.-Mexico border as they await their asylum cases to enter the U.S. Host Tonya Mosley talks to Amnesty International USA's executive director about the conditions there.
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8 novembre 2019
What are high schoolers saying about the impeachment inquiry and the 2020 election? We hear from three new and soon-to-be voters at Putnam City High School in Oklahoma City. Also, for the first time ever, the Federal Reserve is meeting on climate change. The conference is already so overcrowded a special webcast has been set up to meet demand. We get the latest from Bloomberg's Mike Regan.
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8 novembre 2019
Thirty years ago Saturday, the Berlin Wall came down, leading to the reunification of East and West Germany. Host Peter O'Dowd reports. Also, one year after the deadly Camp Fire in northern California, Here & Now's Tonya Mosley reports from Paradise about the townspeople determined to rebuild their community.
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7 novembre 2019
At a young age, the child Mimi Lemay thought was her middle daughter was showing signs of depression and declaring "I am a boy." Her poignant new memoir tells the story of giving their 5-year-old child the choice to live as a boy. Also, the Las Vegas city council recently voted to approve a controversial ban on homeless camping. The rule means people cannot legally sleep on the streets in the downtown area if there are shelter beds available.
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