Here & Now

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NPR and WBUR's live midday news program

630 épisodes

16 septembre 2019
Correspondents from KJZZ's Fronteras Desk were deployed across North and Central America to document key stops along a migrant's journey to the United States. KJZZ's Michel Marizco explains how shifting policies from the Trump Administration are affecting people and governments across the hemisphere. Also, Here & Now's Tonya Mosley gets the latest on the strike involving more than 49,000 General Motors plant workers across the country from Michigan Radio reporter Steve Carmody.
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13 septembre 2019
Two Wisconsin brothers have been charged in a massive counterfeit vape cartridge operation. Authorities say they produced between 3,000 to 5,000 counterfeit THC cartridges with a team of 10 employees. Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reporter Raquel Rutledge has the latest. And, Here & Now tech analyst Ben Brock Johnson joins us to discuss the carbon footprint of China's data centers, which are still mostly powered by coal. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's September 13, 2019 full broadcast.
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13 septembre 2019
Mexico is pushing back against a new rule from the Trump administration that the Supreme Court allowed to proceed this week. The rule effectively bars most Central American migrants from seeking asylum in the U.S., unless they have already sought asylum in another country they passed through. Also, the Trump administration is celebrating the repeal of another Obama-era environmental rule, one that aims to protect wetlands and waterways. We speak with E&E News reporter Ariel Wittenberg.
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12 septembre 2019
In a letter to Congress, 145 CEOs called for expanded background checks and strengthened "red flag" laws. Host Robin Young speaks with Ambition CEO Travis Truett, who signed the letter. Also, 100 years ago this month, hundreds of black residents of rural Arkansas were murdered by their white neighbors, in what became known as the Elaine Massacre.
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12 septembre 2019
Elizabeth Warren will share a stage with Joe Biden for the first time Thursday night in Houston, as she's surged in polls among Democratic voters. We spoke with NPR political correspondent Asma Khalid, who will be in Houston covering the debate. Also, Irish Ambassador to the U.S. Daniel Mulhall dives into what UK's impending exit from the EU means for Ireland.
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11 septembre 2019
Republican strategist Alice Stewart and Democratic strategist Bill Press join hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson discuss the departure of Trump national security adviser John Bolton and the upcoming Democratic presidential debate. Also, to mark the 18th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, we revisit part of our conversation with Mitchell Zuckoff, author of "Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11."
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11 septembre 2019
"Hurricane Man" Josh Morgerman joins Here & Now after returning from witnessing Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas. Starting Sunday, TV viewers can watch his travels to every hurricane over the 2018 storm season. Also, hard seltzer has soared in popularity among American consumers. Craig Giammona, reporter for Bloomberg News, tells us about the drink's meteoric rise.
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10 septembre 2019
British Parliament began a five-week suspension on Tuesday. We spoke to Amanda Sloat, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, about what this means for the UK and Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who lost a second bid for a snap election Monday. And, mortician and author Caitlin Doughty joins Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson to discuss questions about death that she explores in her new book, "Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs: Big Questions from Tiny Mortals About Death."
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10 septembre 2019
Eco-friendly sneaker company Allbirds started with a Kickstarter in 2014, and just five years later, the company has reported it's worth $1.4 billion. We spoke to co-founder Tim Brown about the company's rapid growth. Also, host Jeremy Hobson talks with CNN political analyst Julian Zelizer about the history of diplomacy at Camp David, where Trump's secret meeting with the Taliban could have occurred.
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9 septembre 2019
More than 40 people are confirmed dead in the Bahamas after Hurricane Dorian. NPR's Jason Beaubien gives an update on the recovery efforts underway on Great Abaco Island. Also, host Robin Young speaks with author Malcolm Gladwell about his new book, "Talking to Strangers: What Should We Know About the People We Don't Know."
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9 septembre 2019
The future of peace in Afghanistan is uncertain after President Trump announced that he was canceling secret talks with the Taliban at Camp David. We get reaction from former Navy Admiral James Stavridis. Also, in our conversation with 2020 presidential candidates, Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with Sen. Amy Klobuchar.
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6 septembre 2019
Eighty years after the German invasion of Poland that started World War II, we speak to a historian about the toll the conflict took on the country. Also, for nearly six weeks, coal miners in eastern Kentucky have been blocking a train car full of coal from a company they say owes them thousands of dollars each in backpay. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with one of the miners. And there are new clues as to what might be causing the rapid onset of illnesses striking some individuals who used ...
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6 septembre 2019
The death toll in the Bahamas is now at 30 and is expected to rise. Host Peter O' Dowd speaks with Marvin Dames, minister of national security of the Bahamas, about the relief efforts underway for Hurricane Dorian victims. Also, Oct. 1 will mark 70 years since Mao Zedong, leader of China's Communist Party, founded the People's Republic of China. A new book out this week says Mao's influence on global politics was far greater than is typically recognized, and that its impact continues today. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with author Julia ...
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5 septembre 2019
The National Weather Service refuted Trump's inclusion of Alabama on the list of places Hurricane Dorian would impact, but the White House doubled down. On Wednesday, Trump was displaying a new map, this time with a little spur jutting out from the end of the storm's projected path, seemingly drawn with a black marker, to include Alabama in the forecast. Also, Diana Sanchez, a Colorado woman, delivered a baby in jail last year. Now she's suing those involved. We speak with Mari Newman, Sanchez's lawyer.
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5 septembre 2019
The U.S. and Taliban are in the midst of peace negotiations, but many Afghan women fear losing their rights if a deal comes to fruition. Also, as Democrats debate which candidate will be the most electable on the ballot next to President Trump in November 2020, we look at how voters determine candidates' electability chances. And host Jeremy Hobson speaks with the researchers behind a device that could detect THC — the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis — in someone's breath.
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4 septembre 2019
Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam has announced the government will formally withdraw an extradition bill that has sparked months of demonstrations in the city. The bill would have allowed Hong Kong residents to be sent to mainland China for trials. Also, in new study, scientists have documented how brain structure varies across dog breeds.
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4 septembre 2019
As Hurricane Dorian moves toward the U.S., relief and recovery efforts begin in the Bahamas, amid widespread damage to Abaco and Grand Bahamas. Robin Young speaks with Bahamian senator Fred Mitchell, who provides a view from Nassau. Also, we speak with the parents of one of the victims of the Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crash, who filed a lawsuit against Boeing executives in April.
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3 septembre 2019
In 2017, people in Illinois and Wisconsin saw a green streak blazing across the sky: a meteorite careening into Lake Michigan. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with one of the scientists now trying to find it. Also, since it's tomato season, resident chef Kathy Gunst shares three recipes that make full use of the plant. T
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3 septembre 2019
Uber upended transportation throughout the world. In a new book, author Mike Isaac details the company's remarkable rise, and the misdeeds that forced the resignation of its founder and CEO. Isaac joins host Jeremy Hobson to discuss how Uber's willingness to break rules led to both success and scandal. Also, Brazil's president faces criticism over a huge increase in intentionally set fires in the Amazon. We speak with environmental science professor Mark Cochrane.
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2 septembre 2019
The U.S. Coast Guard in Los Angeles says it "has launched multiple rescue assets to assist more than 30 people in distress on a 75-foot boat near Santa Cruz Island" in response to reports that the vessel was on fire. NPR's Kirk Siegler has the latest. Also, host Robin Young talks to Uber and Lyft driver Moustafa Maklad about his experience in the gig economy, and how a new bill up for consideration in California could fundamentally alter it by making companies like Uber and Lyft treat their workers ...
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